comparing dry and wet fabric painting techniques

No 58 – Series: Fabric Painting Techniques – WET & DRY TECHNIQUES – Experimenting with different paint application tools

How paint application tools deliver different results if used on wet instead of dry fabric

Dear friends of Your Colourful Mind,

Last time we finished our short series on fabric paints. We used

Three posts to study the different types and effects of fabric paint:

  • Fabric paints, Part 1: The different types of fabric paint – Post 52
  • Fabric paints, Part 2: The main characteristics of fabric paints – Post 54
  • Fabric paints, Part 3: Blending and diluting fabric paints – Post 57

 

TODAY we continue what we announced at the end of Post 50 and started in Post 54:

A comparison of wet and dry painting techniques

We plan to use this and some further articles to experiment a bit with different paints and application tools.

The objective is to learn more about how fabric painting results are influenced by the basic technique we choose:

  • a wet technique is applied on wet or dampened fabric with usually thin or diluted paints,
  • a dry technique uses thicker paints on dry fabric.

The main effects of the dryness or the wetness of the fabric:

  • A dry technique is our choice if we wish the paint colours to remain intense and exactly at the place on the fabric where they were applied.
  • A wet technique is applied if we wish the colours to get paled or blended or if we want them to bleed into neighbouring areas.

(Have a look at Post 54  if you are interested in more details.)

Using different fabric paint application tools on dry and on wet fabric

The range of applications tools comprises not only paint brushes or markers or stamps but any object which helps us to get the paint on the fabric.

Example No 1

fabric painting techniques - t-shirt - half dry - half wet - comparing effects of different application tools - here: supplies
post 58 – fabric painting techniques – t-shirt – half dry – half wet – comparing effects of different application tools – here: supplies
abric painting techniques - t-shirt - half dry - half wet - comparing effects of different application tools - here: description of tools
post 58 – fabric painting techniques – t-shirt – half dry – half wet – comparing effects of different application tools – here: description of tools

Here, we used the same application tools (see explanations on left side) on the dry and on the wet side of t-shirt. (Half of it was sprayed wet with a water spray bottle before the paint was applied.)

We can see different effects of the application tools on the wet and the dry side.

This is a zoomed picture of the two t-shirt sleeves.

On both sleeves two different paints were dropped.

On the dry side (left), the colour remains where it was dropped, on the wet side (right) the paint bleeds and blends with the second colour.

fabric painting techniques - t-shirt - half dry - half wet - comparing effects of different application tools
post 58 – fabric painting techniques – t-shirt – half dry – half wet – comparing effects of different application tools

Example No 2

fabric painting techniques - t-shirt - half dry - half wet - comparing effects of different application tools - here: supplies for red and blue t-shirt
post 58 – fabric painting techniques – t-shirt – half dry – half wet – comparing effects of different application tools – here: supplies for red and blue t-shirt
fabric painting techniques - t-shirt blue and pink - half dry - half wet - comparing effects of different application tools - here: picture with application tools
Post 58 -fabric painting techniques – t-shirt blue and pink – half dry – half wet – comparing effects of different application tools – here: picture with application tools

Again, we can easily see that the application tools all have different effects, depending on whether they were used on the dry or on the wet side of the fabric.

fabric painting techniques - t-shirt - blue and pink - half dry - half wet - comparing effects of different application tools
post 58 – fabric painting techniques – t-shirt – blue and pink – half dry – half wet – comparing effects of different application tools

 

Summary of the results:

Both examples demonstrate that the tools we chose in these projects all can be used on either wet or dry fabric.

But we can also clearly see that the same tools create different effects and results if used on wet instead of dry fabric:

  • On dry fabric the paint remains where we applied it, and the paint’s colour remains intense.
  • On wet fabric the paint tends to bleed and to blend with neighbouring areas/paints. The colours get paler and the edges of the painted areas get blurred.
Next time (Post No 59), we will continue with further experiments on wet and dry fabric.

 

Please, don’t hesitate to share your experiences with wet and/or dry fabric painting techniques. Send pictures and a description of your projects by email: margot@your-colourful-mind.com.

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Take care,

signature - Margot

 

 

 

 

4 thoughts on “No 58 – Series: Fabric Painting Techniques – WET & DRY TECHNIQUES – Experimenting with different paint application tools”

  1. Hi Margot,

    great. Some further nice examples of wet painting I was looking for.

    Best Ferdie

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