fabric painting - printing with foam stamp - featured image post 92

No 92 – Series: Fabric Painting Techniques – Stamping, Part 11

Categories of stamps. – And playing around with a kangaroo. 🙂

Dear friends of Your Colourful Mind,

Last time, I announced that I wanted to use the next post to present self-carved round rubber stamps, and some examples of the many ways we can use them.

However, I changed my plans for today’s blog when I went through

All the projects we have done so far in our little series about the Categories of stamps:
post 92a - table - categories of stamps
post 92a – table – categories of stamps

When I compiled the list of our stamping projects, I realized that  so far I have very much focused on the application of self-made stamps.

There is nothing wrong with that because it is so much fun to create our own stamps:

Experimenting with different materials and tools is very creative and each of our self-created stamps is unique.

However, now I feel that I’ve neglected to talk about the exciting potential of using commercial stamps. 

Pre-made stamps also have the advantage, that we can start stamping immediately and easily, – as soon as we have bought a stamp.

No need to invest time and energy in the stamp-production! 🙂

I decided to postpone the final rubber-carving project a bit and to use the next few posts to present projects in which I worked with commercial stamps.

Printing with commercial stamps

Most craft shops offer a broad selection of pre-cut or pre-carved stamps and we can also find nice carved wood stamps in antique shops or on cultural-handicraft markets.

Kangaroo-stamping on indigo-dyed T-shirt

I recently attended a fabric-dyeing workshop. We worked with different Shibori-techniques and it was really fascinating to see how the designs evolved during the dyeing process!

Now I have a set of T-shirts, scarfs and tea towels which were just white before and now all look unique and interesting: the indigo left very special blueish-white patterns on each of them.

Dyeing techniques can help us to create beautiful backgrounds for fabric painting projects.

In this project I applied a pre-made kangaroo stamp on an indigo-dyed T-shirt which I plan to use as a nightshirt.

The stamp is made of foam and came with a stamp pad which we can use as a paint applicator:

First I spread the paint on the pad, then I pressed the stamp onto the paint-soaked pad.

Using a stamp pad is a good way to make sure that the paint gets evenly distributed on the stamp’s surface. It also helps to get clear prints.

fabric painting - kangaroo foam stamp and stamp pad
fabric painting – kangaroo foam stamp and stamp pad
fabric painting - preparing to stamp with foam stamp and stamp pad
fabric painting – preparing to stamp with foam stamp and stamp pad

I got clean and crisp kangaroo-prints.

fabric painting - first print with foam stamp - crisp and clear
fabric painting – first print with foam stamp – crisp and clear
post 92 - printing with kangaroo-stamp on T-shirt
post 92 – printing with kangaroo-stamp on T-shirt
Are you curious to learn more about stamping on fabric?

The new book ‘Your fast & easy guide, number 2 – Stamping’ gives a lot of background information on the different stamp production methods and the printing process. And more than 20 project presentations help to understand the stamping process step-by-step.

The stamping guide book is the second book in my series about fabric painting and will be published in May 2017.

If you are a subscriber to this blog, you can order a sample tutorial from the stamping book for free. Click HERE to learn more about this offer.

Don’t miss any project presentation or information on the new fabric painting book series: SIGN UP TO OUR BLOG TO RECEIVE A SHORT EMAIL WHEN A NEW POST IS PUBLISHED.

Cheers,

Margot

 

2 thoughts on “No 92 – Series: Fabric Painting Techniques – Stamping, Part 11”

  1. Thanks for mentioning my workshop and my stamps. I am running this workshop again in July in my Sydney studio and the stamps including lots of Aussie animals are always availabilw on my website
    Lisa walton
    http://Www.lisawaltonartist.com

  2. Hi Margot, thank you for the new interesting idea. I will try it! 🙂

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