fabric painting techniques - fabric colour bleeding-process on wet fabric

No 59 – Series: Fabric Painting Techniques – WET & DRY TECHNIQUES – Experimenting with colour-bleeding

Colour-Bleeding on wet fabric takes time!

Dear friends of Your Colourful Mind,

Last time we started some experimenting with painting on dry and wet fabric. We wish to learn more about the differences between wet and dry fabric painting techniques.

Our comparison of the effects of painting application tools on wet and dry fabric (see Post 58) confirmed what we had talked about earlier (Post 54):

The main differences between painting on dry and on wet fabric:

  • We paint on dry fabric if we wish the paint colours to remain intense and exactly at the place on the fabric where we applied them.
  • We paint on wet fabric if we want the colours to get paled or blended or if we wish them to bleed into neighbouring areas on the fabric.

Today we have a closer look at the colour-bleeding process on wet fabric.

We learned already (Post 58) that on wet fabric the paint colours soon after the application start to get paler and that the edges of the painted areas tend to blur.

The following project again compares the differences of painting on dry and wet fabric but focuses on the colour-bleeding process on wet fabric.

I used sponge dabber brushes as application tools and three different transparent fabric paints. (Most fabric paints have a transparent consistency: they are thinner than opaque paints but thicker then diluted thin paints.)

fabric painting techniques - apron - half dry - half wet - comparing effects of colour-bleeding - here: supplies
post 59 – fabric painting techniques – apron – half dry – half wet – comparing effects of colour-bleeding – here: supplies

I decided to paint on an apron which I first gave some background colouring:

M0136 - 08-16 - 054a - YCM post 59

The following images concentrate on the paint colour-bleeding process, which took some time.

fabric painting techniques - apron - half dry - half wet - comparing effects of colour-bleeding - here: no bleeding directly after paint application
post 59 – fabric painting techniques – apron – half dry – half wet – comparing effects of colour-bleeding – here: no bleeding directly after paint application

First, no bleeding could be seen, neither on the dry half nor on the wet half of the apron.

But soon the colours on the wet side started to bleed. This process continued slowly and only stopped when the fabric and the paints on it had dried up completely.

fabric painting techniques - apron - half dry - half wet - comparing effects of colour-bleeding - here: final result after 25 hours
post 59 – fabric painting techniques – apron – half dry – half wet – comparing effects of colour-bleeding – here: final result after 25 hours

 

Zooming some areas of the painting makes it easier to see how the bleeding proceeded.

fabric painting techniques - apron - half dry - half wet - comparing effects of colour-bleeding - here: picture zoom directly after paint application
post 59 – fabric painting techniques – apron – half dry – half wet – comparing effects of colour-bleeding – here: picture zoom directly after paint application
fabric painting techniques - apron - half dry - half wet - comparing effects of colour-bleeding - here: picture zoom 25 min after paint application
post 59 – fabric painting techniques – apron – half dry – half wet – comparing effects of colour-bleeding – here: picture zoom 25 min after paint application
fabric painting techniques - apron - half dry - half wet - comparing effects of colour-bleeding - here: picture zoom 25 Hours after paint application - fabric completely dry now
post 59 – fabric painting techniques – apron – half dry – half wet – comparing effects of colour-bleeding – here: picture zoom 25 Hours after paint application – fabric completely dry now

I found it very interesting to observe the bleeding process over time!

At the moment, I don’t yet understand why the bleeding concentrated on just one side of the little stamped dots; thus

It seems that there is a lot to learn and to discover about the effects of wet fabric painting techniques. 🙂

 

Do you already have a better knowledge about wet techniques? Have you done any projects on wet fabric?

Please, share your work with us and send images of it and some background information by email to margot@your-colourful-mind.com.

And, if you don’t want to miss out on future project presentations: don’t forget to SIGN UP TO RECEIVE NEW BLOG POSTS VIA EMAIL .

Have fun! 🙂  🙂  🙂

signature - Margot

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