Category Archives: Series – fabric painting design contribution

All posts which present project contributions from the website’s visitors.

No 75 – Series: Fabric Painting Design Contribution – Stamping with self-carved rubber stamp

Printing REPEATED PATTERNS

Be prepared, – it’s addictive!

Dear friends of Your Colourful Mind,
  • Last week we started our series on stamping. – Our first project helped us to realize how easy stamping can be. We can use any everyday objects with an even surface as stamps. And even the very simple shapes can help us to create colourful patterns on fabric.
  • Next time we plan to discuss the different ways of stamp-creation in more detail.
  • But today we use the opportunity to have a look at a more advanced stamp-creating technique:

Carving rubber-block stamps – Design contribution from Jaypi

Jaypi, the most active contributor of design ideas at Your Colourful Mind,

Now she writes (email 21.11.16):

“… When I strolled around in a craft shop, the sales person recommended to give rubber-carving a try. I hesitated because I didn’t have any carving tools and materials at home. But then I bought a set of cutters and some rubber blocks.

Carving is not as easy as I thought! My first carving products were only good for learning purposes, I couldn’t use them for printing. But after some practicing my feeling now is that it can become very addictive.

Attached I send photos of a project I finished last weekend. I used the design of my Danish tableware as a template. First I practiced drawing a copy of the design on paper, then I transferred it directly on the rubber block. The printing was fun! …”

stamp-design-jaypi-practicing-on-paper
post75-stamp-design-jaypi-practicing-on-paper
stamp-design-jaypi-test-print-of-carved-stamp
post75-stamp-design-jaypi-test-print-of-carved-stamp
fabric-stamping-design-contribution-jaypi-printing-with-self-carved-stamp
post75-fabric-stamping-design-contribution-jaypi-printing-with-self-carved-stamp
fabric-stamping-design-contribution-jaypi-a-closer-look-at-the-printed-design
post75-fabric-stamping-design-contribution-jaypi-a-closer-look-at-the-printed-design

Jaypi finished her email saying that she found it very difficult to stop printing.

So she used her three stamps for the creation of some Christmas presents:

fabric-stamping-jaypi-self-carved-stamps-used-on-tote-bags
post 75-fabric-stamping-jaypi-self-carved-stamps-used-on-tote-bags
fabric-stamping-jaypi-self-carved-stamps-used-on-little-fabric-bags
post75-fabric-stamping-jaypi-self-carved-stamps-used-on-little-fabric-bags

 

Thank you very much, Jaypi, for this design contribution!

I hope that Jaypi will continue carving stamps and send in more project examples! 🙂

What about you? Would you like to present some of your fabric painting projects, too? Share images of you work with us! (Send them to margot@your-colourful-mind.com).

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Cheers,

signature - Margot

No 66 – Series: Fabric Painting Design Contribution – Stencilling with tape & fabric spray paint

Learn from Albert’s design contributions how creative working with tape and fabric spray paint can be!

Dear friends of Your Colourful Mind,
The website and the blog of Your Colourful Mind are platforms which we can use
  • to share our experiences with fabric painting,
  • to discuss our ideas
  • and to publish images of our projects.

All the image contributions which you have sent in so far were presented on this blog and are collected in a special album of our Gallery.

Today we add some further images to the Gallery!

We say thank you to Albert again, for contributing images of his recent fabric painting projects.

We published some project images from Albert already some time ago (see Post 13). At that time, he was a fresh beginner, – excited about the result of his first projects.

Albert now writes (email 15.09.16) that after his good start he never thought about stopping fabric painting. Instead, he has created many colourful pieces of clothing for himself, his wife and some friends.

He says, “I follow the blog and understand there are other ways to paint on textiles. But I stick with textile sprays and use tape to stencil. Will try something else if it becomes boring.”

Have a look at some of Albert’s recent projects:

Fabric painting on t-shirt - Stencilling with tape - Albert's design No 1
Post 66 – Fabric painting project – stencilling on t-shirt with tape and fabric spray paints – contribution 1 from Albert
Fabric painting on t-shirt - Stencilling with tape - Albert's design No 2
Post 66 – Fabric painting project – stencilling on t-shirt with tape and fabric spray paints – contribution 2 from Albert
Fabric painting on t-shirt - Stencilling with tape - Albert's design No 3
Post 66 – Fabric painting project – stencilling on t-shirt with tape and fabric spray paints – contribution 3 from Albert
Fabric painting on t-shirt - Stencilling with tape – Albert’s design No 4
Post 66 – Fabric painting project – stencilling on t-shirt with tape and fabric spray paints – contribution 4 from Albert
Fabric painting on t-shirt - Stencilling with tape – Albert’s design No 5
Post 66 – Fabric painting project – stencilling on t-shirt with tape and fabric spray paints – contribution 5 from Albert

It’s great to see all these images and to realize the huge creativity-opportunities which stencilling with tape and fabric spray paints offer!

I am really looking forward to presenting Albert’s future project contributions! 🙂

When will you share images of your fabric painting projects with us? Help us to learn from you and to add to our Gallery! Don’t hesitate any longer and send images of your work to margot@your-colourful-mind.com. Thank you!

And  sign up to receive new blog posts via email to make sure that you don’t miss out on any new project presentations.

Cheers,

signature - Margot

No 49 – Series: Fabric painting design contribution – Stamping – Fruit stamping with apple on t-shirt

We don’t have to work hard to create our own stamps! Let’s just look around in the kitchen!

Dear friends of Your Colourful Mind,

Last time we discussed our upcoming projects and our list included a series we started some time ago:

Series of YOUR fabric painting design contributions.

In Post No 4 we presented the very first contribution from a visitor at Your Colourful Mind, it was Jaypi’s mandala-t-shirt which she had created as a friend’s birthday gift.

Since then, Jaypi hasn’t stopped experimenting with different fabric painting techniques. And, luckily, she always shared her experiences and the results of her projects with us (posts No 6, No 10, No 37 and No 45).

Fruit stamping

is the latest technique Jaypi has been working with. Thanks to her email we are able to have a look at the result of her recent project:

fabric painting - t-shirt - fruit stamping
post 49 – fabric painting – design contribution – Jaypi – t-shirt – fruit stamping with apple and thick paints

Jaypi writes (email 03.06.16),

From time to time, I go through the boards on your Pinterest page. It really helps in finding new ideas for fabric painting projects.

I have never worked with stamps so far; I don’t like buying them – that’s too easy -, but I also don’t want to put much effort in creating my own stamps. Also, I don’t have the tools at home, for example, to carve a stamp from a rubber eraser.

Then I found some images of fruit stamps on your Pinterest board “fabric painting – stamping”. I thought that must be easy, – and it is easy!

I used some red and blue fabric paint left from recent projects and applied them with a paintbrush on the half of an apple. Really easy! And fun!”

I wish to send a very big THANK YOU to Jaypi! I am always excited when I get an email from you, Jaypi. 🙂 Please, continue sharing your work with us!

After having read Jaypi’s email I had a look at the Pinterest board “fabric painting – stamping” myself and actually was surprised about the many pins we’ve collected already!

And fruit stamping definitely is one of the easiest stamping techniques!

I am wondering which other fruits or vegetables could be suitable fabric painting stamps.

It must be fun to experiment with different items we find in the kitchen. And nothing used in a project would be wasted because, as soon as the project is finished, the fruits or veggies still can be eaten (after cutting off a slice to eliminate the paint). 🙂

Do you have any experiences with fruit stamping? Share them with us and send images of your projects to margot@your-colourful-mind.com. Thank you!

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I wish you a good time,

signature - Margot

 

 

 

 

No 45 – Fabric painting design contribution – Creating your own “fashion trends” – Example: free-hand flower painting

Yes, YOU can be a FASHION DESIGNER! – Use fabric painting to create your own fashion trends! 🙂

Dear friends of Your Colourful Mind,
We will soon finish our series of projects around the comparison of fabric painting and adult colouring books:
  • The series started with the discussion of some easier ways of design creation, such as tracing (post No 33), stencilling (post No 34) and stamping (post No 36).
  • We then continued with a focus on freehand drawing and painting. So far, we have used our “geometric patterns approach” to have some guidance in the development of our freehand drawing capabilities (posts No 41, No 42, No 43 and No 44).
  • Next time (post No 46), at the end of the series, we plan to present some “real” freehand drawing projects where patterns or illustrations are created without any supporting tool or theme.

Thus, it’s really great how nicely the latest design contribution fits into our timetable!

Some days ago, Jaypi sent in pictures of her latest project:

Free-hand flower painting on women’s apparel

In the past, Jaypi preferred to work with tape and fabric spray to create unique designs on t-shirts (see posts No 6, No 10 and No 37). But our discussion of the pros and cons of adult colouring books and fabric painting has animated her to try something new.

Jaypi writes in her email (19.05.16), “Since I was a child, I never again felt any interest in colouring-in books. And I still think that’s not the right hobby for me. But my flower-project was fun. As soon as I had started drawing, I got very absorbed into the process, and focused and concentrated. I found it difficult to stop! And I liked the simple and clear design. So I decided to continue to work on my first t-shirt, I completed the front, and then I also did the back of the shirt.”

Jaypi continues, “Then I went and bought some more t-shirts and a jacket and continued “flowering”.

This is a very good example of the relaxing benefits of fabric painting!

It is easy to see how Jaypi got “pulled” into her flower-project, how she “got into the flow” (Wikipedia: ‘complete absorption in what one does’)!

Jaypi adds, “Finally, I had to finish my series of flower shirts. But that might not be the end of the story. I am thinking about colouring-in the flowers. I am not sure: Should I use fabric paint or continue with fabric markers?”

To answer Jaypi’s question: I would recommend to use a paint brush and fabric paints to colour-in the flowers on the shirts and the jacket. Using fabric markers is possible, of course, but they might get used up too quickly as the areas to be coloured are not very small.

I am very curious to hear how Jaypi will decide on this. And I hope she will send us a picture to share her decision with us!

Using fabric painting to create our own fashion trends

Besides the flow-effect, :), Jaypi’s project delivers another – very real and usable – outcome: the nicely designed t-shirts which can be combined and worn together with the jacket, – all having the same design!

And it will be interesting to see which kind of further development Jaypi’s newly created fashion trend will take: Will she colour-in the flowers? Or will she apply fabric spray on all items of her “fashion line”?

To be honest, I have never thought about creating my own “fashion collection”. So far, I have only created individual pieces.

But I can imagine that it is even more fun to design a range of clothes – let’s say a pair of jeans and a jeans jacket –  in the same style.

We should follow up this idea in future!

Would do you think about it? Please, let us know if you already have created collections of fabric items. Send images of YOUR WORK to margot@your-colourful-mind.com.

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Thanks again to Jaypi, 

and Cheers to everyone,

signature - Margot

 

 

 

 

No 40 – Fabric painting design contribution – Fabric painting projects with kids – fun for everyone

Dear friends of Your Colourful Mind,

Last weekend I had a look at the numbers of our website, – the numbers of visitors and views. I am happy that I can report about very positive developments:

Our fabric painting network is getting more and more momentum!

More and more visitors come around and have a look at the webpage, and many are loyal friends now and visit the site regularly.

And it’s fantastic that now more of YOU – the regular visitors and loyal friends of Your Colourful Mind – decide to share their fabric painting projects with all of us.

This is great because it helps us to find new ideas and inspirations for our own projects.

Alice is one of those regular visitors who now also became an idea contributor. Thanks a lot, Alice, for your contribution and your engagement!

How to organize fabric painting projects with kids

When Alice (in her comment on post No 36) asked how to conduct stamping projects with her kids without using knives or other sharp tools, I recommended to have a look at our Pinterest board “fabric painting -stamping” (this is the link) where we collect stamping ideas from different sources.

Self-made kangaroo stamps for fabric painting project

Alice did so and now writes (email 27.04.16), “Thanks for sending the link to the pinterest page. I had a look at it with my kids and we got several ideas for our fabric painting projects. Finally, we decided to choose a kangaroo as the “design subject” and to apply different stamping methods.

I took an eraser and tried to carve a kangaroo. This was difficult! First I drew the shape of a kangaroo on the rubber, then I cut it out. I stamped on a blank apron. As you can see, my kangaroo looks a bit strange, its neck is too thick and its hopping doesn’t look kangaroo-like. The kids laughed a lot about it. But I like my kangaroo, it’s special, somehow.

fabric painting - self-made stamp
post 40 – fabric painting – design contribution – Alice – preparation of kangaroo rubber stamp 1
fabric painting - self-made stamp kangaroo
post 40 – fabric painting – design contribution – Alice – preparation of kangaroo rubber stamp 2
fabric painting - apron - with stamps
post 40 – fabric painting – apron – design contribution – Alice – self-made kangaroo rubber stamp

My older daughter used a kangaroo-shaped cookie cutter to cut the shape of a kangaroo out of a big sweet potato. She used the stamp to print on a blank t-shirt.

We found that the main challenge is to get a completely even surface when you cut the potato into halves. If it’s not even the print also will not be completely even.

My daughter also used the cookie cutter as a stencil, on the back of her t-shirt. It worked both ways!

fabric painting - self-made potato stamp kangaroo
post 40 – fabric painting – design contribution – Alice – preparation of kangaroo stamp – cut from sweet potato 1
fabric painting - self-made potato stamp kangaroo on t-shirt
post 40 – fabric painting – design contribution – Alice – preparation of kangaroo stamp – cut from sweet potato 2
fabric painting - t-shirt - stamping with potato stamp
post 40 – fabric painting – t-shirt – design contribution – Alice – kangaroo stamp – cut from sweet potato

And my son used a stamp we created by gluing a little kangaroo to a bottle cap. But it broke off the bottle cap after just three stamping attempts. First, my son was angry but then he used the kangaroo as a stencil which was also easier to handle for him.

fabric painting - stamp kangaroo
post 40 – fabric painting – design contribution – Alice – preparation of kangaroo stamp – kangaroo shape glued to bottle top 1
fabric painting - self-made stamp on t-shirt
post 40 – fabric painting – design contribution – Alice – preparation of kangaroo stamp – kangaroo shape glued to bottle top 2
fabric painting - kids t-shirt - kangaroo stamp
post 40 – fabric painting – kids t-shirt- design contribution – Alice – self-made stamp – kangaroo shape glued to bottle and used as stencil

We spent a nice afternoon together working on our projects.”

 

Based on Alice’s email and the pictures, I think, we can compile

Some learnings on fabric painting projects with kids:

  • Collecting and choosing design ideas together and preparing the project together helps to get everyone involved and motivated.
  • It can be an enjoyable experience for the kids to see that their parents are not perfect all the time but nevertheless are happy with the results of their work. (This can be an enjoyable experience for the parents themselves, too. 🙂 )
  • Be prepared that the chosen technique might not work out as planned and that switching to another technique can be the only solution.
  • Therefore: To prevent disappointment and frustrations, especially with little kids, always have more than just one technique or tool at hand.

Thanks again, Alice, for sharing your experiences with us! And please pass our thanks to your kids, too.

We will continue to share projects and work results. Please, send images of YOUR WORK to margot@your-colourful-mind.com.

And, if you haven’t yet done so, you might wish to sign up to receive new blog posts via email, – just to make sure that you don’t miss any info and tips in newly published blog posts.

Cheers,

signature - Margot
signature – Margot from Your Colourful Mind

 

No 39 – Fabric painting design contribution – How easy it is to start with fabric painting!

Dear friends of Your Colourful Mind,

Is it difficult to start with fabric painting?

In his comment (07.04.16) on post No 33  Andy assumed that it is difficult to start with fabric painting.

But he believed it to be more interesting than adult colouring books and decided to give fabric painting a try.

I am very happy that he also decided to share his “start-up-experience” with us! 🙂

Instead of adult colouring books:

Fabric painting starter project – Designing geometric patterns and colouring them in

Andy writes in his email (24.04.16): “I bought a blank t-shirt and a red and a black fabric pen. Decided to go for geometric patterns. Used a ruler. Then I started to color in some of the geometric shapes. Soon realized that using fabric pens for coloring the larger areas took too long. I got some black acrylic paint from my sister, mixed it with medium she recommended. And colored the black areas with brush and paint. Result: like my t-shirt! Design process was fun. But: you need enough space/a working area to work with paint.”

Fabric painting - preparation of geometric pattern
post 39 – fabric painting – design contribution – Andy – preparation of geometric pattern
fabric painting - comparing results of fabric marker and fabric paint
post 39 – fabric painting – design contribution – Andy – comparing colouring-in with fabric marker and with paint and paintbrush
fabric painting - t-shirt with self-made geometric patterns
post 39 – fabric painting – t-shirt – design contribution – Andy – self-made geometric patterns, coloured-in with fabric marker (red) and fabric paint (black)

Andy doesn’t explicitly say in his email that starting with fabric painting was easier than he had assumed. Nevertheless, he said it was fun, and I trust that he now agrees with me on this:

It is astonishingly easy to start with fabric painting!

And it’s easy to have a lot of fun while creating our very first designs!

Imagine, Andy just sat down, took a fabric marker and a ruler, and started to draw on his t-shirt! He didn’t have any templates or other supporting tools. And very soon, he had created a great geometric pattern which he then could colour-in. That’s impressive, isn’t it?

And Andy also used his first project to gain

some first-hand fabric painting learning points:

  • Fabric markers are great for drawing and outlining purposes. And we can also use them to colour-in smaller areas. But they are not ideal if we wish to colour bigger areas on our fabric items.
  • Paint brushes and fabric paint make it easy to colour in the bigger shapes and parts of our designs/illustrations.
  • If we wish to draw and paint on bigger fabric items, we should organize a large enough working area where we can leave our piece of work between different phases of the projects or while we wait for the paint to dry.

Thanks a lot for sharing your work and your experience with us, Andy!

We can hope that Andy’s contribution encourages further sharing of first-hand fabric painting experiences. 🙂

Please, send images of YOUR WORK to margot@your-colourful-mind.com.

Cheers,

signature - Margot

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