All posts by margot

No 95 – Fabric painting – Is it your thing? – Give it a try!

Download the FREE STAMPING-TUTORIAL and enjoy the warm-up project! It’s so easy to do!

Dear friends of Your Colourful Mind,

Yes, fabric painting is a very creative, relaxing and productive activity.

But is it YOUR thing?

Is there a chance that you too will find fabric painting a fascinating and relaxing activity?

You’re the only person who can answer this question, of course.

The best way to find out is to give fabric painting a try. 🙂

Get started with a little fun-project

Fabric stamping is a very flexible technique and working on this little fun-project – which doesn’t need much preparation and equipment – will help you to get a fast and easy access into fabric painting.

This tutorial gives you an easy start. – And it’s for free!

CLICK HERE (or on the image) to get YOUR FREE DOWNLOAD!

 

Expect more to come!

This is just the first in a series of fabric stamping tutorial downloads.

And they are all free for the subscribers of YOUR COLOURFUL MIND’s newsletter. 🙂

Now it’s time to start your fabric-painting project! Follow the easy instructions in the tutorial and have fun!

And don’t forget to send images of your work – we could publish them in one of the next blog posts (Send the images via email to margot@your-colourful.mind.com).

Enjoy yourself,

Margot

 

 

No 94 – Series: Fabric Painting Techniques – Stamping, Part 13

Another successful cooperation of our two stamp-friends – using their positive and negative sides to create something new and nice.

Dear friends of Your Colourful Mind,

I had so much fun with the two pre-made stamps which I used in the last project that I decided to let them work together in another project.

But this time, it took me several steps to get satisfying results.

Project: Printing with two very similar pre-made stamps

As seen last time, the negative and the positive areas of these two stamps are mirrored by each other:

The positive areas of the left stamp – the areas that stand up and get printed – are the negative – the not printed – areas of the right stamp and vice versa.

fabric painting - the positive of one stamp is the negative of the other
fabric painting – the positive of one stamp is the negative of the other

This means that each stamp’s positive areas can help to cover the negative areas – the not-printed areas – of the other stamp.

This time, I used the two stamps to print on a grey T-shirt.

fabric painting - supplies for a printing project
fabric painting – supplies for a printing project

I started with black fabric paint which I applied to the stamps with the help of a stamp pad.

fabric painting - starting with black prints
fabric painting – starting with black prints

Then I used white fabric paint to add more prints on and around the first ones.

 

This was the result of the first printing-round.

I was not too happy, it looked just grey and colourless. 🙁

post 94 - fabric painting - result of the first printing round
post 94 – fabric painting – result of the first printing round

So I decided to add some purple prints:

post 94 - fabric painting - result of the second printing round
post 94 – fabric painting – result of the second printing round

I was still not impressed. Not colourful enough. 🙁

The next step didn’t make it better. I used a simple rectangular stamp to bring more colour in, but the prints came out very pale. 🙁

post 94 - fabric painting - result of the third printing round
post 94 – fabric painting – result of the third printing round

I tried to make them stronger by using a paint brush to apply the paint directly on the weak prints.

fabric painting - using a paint brush to intensify the prints' colour
fabric painting – using a paint brush to intensify the prints’ colour

 

This is the final result, and – fortunately! 🙂 – I am happy with it! 🙂

post 94 - fabric painting - result of the third printing round
post 94 – fabric painting – result of the third printing round

 

Today’s project shows why we should never give up too early if the results of a fabric painting project are not satisfying.

There is nearly always the chance to move on, to continue with new ideas. Often, adding some more prints or applying another technique is all we need to do the get new and better results.

I very much enjoyed working with pre-made stamps. But now it’s time to get back to continue working with self-made stamps.

I will use the next posts to demonstrate how flexible self-carved stamps can be.

Are you curious to learn more about the stamping process?

You will find a lot of design ideas, instructions and sample project presentations in the new book ‘Relax creatively – Fabric stamping – Your fast & easy guide, number 2 – Stamping’.

It’s the second book in my series about fabric painting and will be published soon. (Click on this link for more information about the book series.)

If you are a subscriber to this blog, you can order a sample tutorial from the stamping book for free. Click HERE to learn more about this offer.

You also might wish to have a ‘Look Inside’ the first book of my guidebook series, The Basics. Click here!

Don’t miss any project presentation or information on the new fabric painting book series: SIGN UP TO OUR BLOG TO RECEIVE A SHORT EMAIL WHEN A NEW POST IS PUBLISHED.

Cheers,

Margot

No 93 – Series: Fabric Painting Techniques – Stamping, Part 12

The positive and the negative – Often they are close friends 🙂 and help each other to create something new.

Dear friends of Your Colourful Mind,

Sometimes negative doesn’t mean bad. It’s just the other side of the medal. And it can be necessary to make the picture complete.

This is the case with

The ‘positive’ and ‘negative’ parts of a stamp.

Most cut or carved stamps have positive and negative areas:

The positive area on the stamp’s printing surface is composed of those parts of the stamp material that stand up and therefore take up the paint and get printed.

the positive effect in stamping
the positive effect in stamping

 

The negative area are those parts which were cut or carved away so they don’t take up paint and don’t get printed.

the negative effect in stamping
the negative effect in stamping

 

Project: Combining the positive and the negative

In this project, I worked with two stamps which really fitted well together.

Each of them on its own was able to create nice prints but letting them work as a team helped me to create colourful images by combining their negative and the positive sides.

fabric painting - the positive of one stamp is the negative of the other
fabric painting – the positive of one stamp is the negative of the other

 

The negative and the positive areas of these two stamps are mirrored by each other: The positive areas of the left stamp are the negative areas of the right stamp and vice versa.

First, I used only one of the two stamps to print on a tea towel.

The positive areas – the standing up parts of the stamp – created nice images.

fabric painting - premade stamp on tea towel
fabric painting – premade stamp on tea towel

 

 

post 93 - fabric painting - printing with a premade stamp on a tea towel
post 93 – fabric painting – printing with a premade stamp on a tea towel

Then I took the second stamp and applied it exactly on those parts of the tea towel where I had placed the first stamp’s prints.

The positive parts of the second stamp now nicely covered the negative – not painted areas – of the first stamp.

fabric painting - overprinting the negative with the positive
fabric painting – overprinting the negative with the positive

 

post 93 - fabric painting - cooperation of positive and negative on a tea towel
post 93 – fabric painting – cooperation of positive and negative on a tea towel

Here is another example of the two stamps’ successful cooperation:

post 93 - fabric painting - two premade stamps work together on a tote bag
post 93 – fabric painting – two premade stamps work together on a tote bag

 

It was a lot of fun to work with these two pre-made stamps – so easy and nice to cover the negative of the first with the positive of the second. 🙂

Are you curious to learn more about the stamping process?

You will find a lot of inspirations and guidelines in the  new book ‘Relax creatively – Fabric stamping – Your fast & easy guide, number 2 – Stamping’.

It’s the second book in my series about fabric painting and will be published soon. (Click on this link for more information about the book series.)

If you are a subscriber to this blog, you can order a sample tutorial from the stamping book for free. Click HERE to learn more about this offer.

Don’t miss any project presentation or information on the new fabric painting book series: SIGN UP TO OUR BLOG TO RECEIVE A SHORT EMAIL WHEN A NEW POST IS PUBLISHED.

Cheers,

Margot

No 92 – Series: Fabric Painting Techniques – Stamping, Part 11

Categories of stamps. – And playing around with a kangaroo. 🙂

Dear friends of Your Colourful Mind,

Last time, I announced that I wanted to use the next post to present self-carved round rubber stamps, and some examples of the many ways we can use them.

However, I changed my plans for today’s blog when I went through

All the projects we have done so far in our little series about the Categories of stamps:
post 92a - table - categories of stamps
post 92a – table – categories of stamps

When I compiled the list of our stamping projects, I realized that  so far I have very much focused on the application of self-made stamps.

There is nothing wrong with that because it is so much fun to create our own stamps:

Experimenting with different materials and tools is very creative and each of our self-created stamps is unique.

However, now I feel that I’ve neglected to talk about the exciting potential of using commercial stamps. 

Pre-made stamps also have the advantage, that we can start stamping immediately and easily, – as soon as we have bought a stamp.

No need to invest time and energy in the stamp-production! 🙂

I decided to postpone the final rubber-carving project a bit and to use the next few posts to present projects in which I worked with commercial stamps.

Printing with commercial stamps

Most craft shops offer a broad selection of pre-cut or pre-carved stamps and we can also find nice carved wood stamps in antique shops or on cultural-handicraft markets.

Kangaroo-stamping on indigo-dyed T-shirt

I recently attended a fabric-dyeing workshop. We worked with different Shibori-techniques and it was really fascinating to see how the designs evolved during the dyeing process!

Now I have a set of T-shirts, scarfs and tea towels which were just white before and now all look unique and interesting: the indigo left very special blueish-white patterns on each of them.

Dyeing techniques can help us to create beautiful backgrounds for fabric painting projects.

In this project I applied a pre-made kangaroo stamp on an indigo-dyed T-shirt which I plan to use as a nightshirt.

The stamp is made of foam and came with a stamp pad which we can use as a paint applicator:

First I spread the paint on the pad, then I pressed the stamp onto the paint-soaked pad.

Using a stamp pad is a good way to make sure that the paint gets evenly distributed on the stamp’s surface. It also helps to get clear prints.

fabric painting - kangaroo foam stamp and stamp pad
fabric painting – kangaroo foam stamp and stamp pad
fabric painting - preparing to stamp with foam stamp and stamp pad
fabric painting – preparing to stamp with foam stamp and stamp pad

I got clean and crisp kangaroo-prints.

fabric painting - first print with foam stamp - crisp and clear
fabric painting – first print with foam stamp – crisp and clear
post 92 - printing with kangaroo-stamp on T-shirt
post 92 – printing with kangaroo-stamp on T-shirt
Are you curious to learn more about stamping on fabric?

The new book ‘Your fast & easy guide, number 2 – Stamping’ gives a lot of background information on the different stamp production methods and the printing process. And more than 20 project presentations help to understand the stamping process step-by-step.

The stamping guide book is the second book in my series about fabric painting and will be published in May 2017.

If you are a subscriber to this blog, you can order a sample tutorial from the stamping book for free. Click HERE to learn more about this offer.

Don’t miss any project presentation or information on the new fabric painting book series: SIGN UP TO OUR BLOG TO RECEIVE A SHORT EMAIL WHEN A NEW POST IS PUBLISHED.

Cheers,

Margot

 

No 91 – Series: Fabric Painting Techniques – Stamping, Part 10

Carving rubber stamps – Today: The letters of the alphabet.

Dear friends of Your Colourful Mind,

This is another post in our little series about the

Creation of carved stamps.

(You can find an overview of the various categories of stamp production in Post 79.)

As we know now (see Post No 86, Post 87, and Post 88), carving is an activity which needs practice!

Carving rubber blocks with linoleum cutters is not very difficult.

In the beginning, however, our rubber carving projects should focus on clear and simple lines and patterns to make the learning process easier and enjoyable.

Project – Carving the letters of the alphabet

Of course, carving ALL letters of the alphabet is quite a project! It takes a lot of time. 🙂

However, if we keep the design of the letter-shapes clear and straight, the carving is not very demanding.

Instead, it’s very relaxing!

And it’s a very useful project because we can use the carved letter-stamps again and again, for example

  • to write names or short quotes on T-shirts,
  • to decorate tea towels, tote bags and other fabric items (with the name of the person we wish to surprise with a personal present, for example)
  • to create a colourful chaos on a fabric product by printing layers of letters, without any order or meaning.

I started the alphabet project by drawing the shapes of the letters with a soft pencil on equally sized pieces of paper.

carving the alphabet 1 - drawing the letters
carving the alphabet 1 – drawing the letters

Next, I transferred the letter-shapes to the rubber blocks by placing the paper pieces on the block, face down, and using my thumbnail to rub the reverse side of each drawing.

carving the alphabet 2 - transfering letter shapes to rubber block
carving the alphabet 2 – transfering letter shapes to rubber block

I then used a marker pen to trace the transferred drawings again, to make sure they’d be durable and to clarify which parts I’d have to carve away.

Now I cut away all the areas of the rubber blocks which were outside the letter shapes and no longer needed.

carving the alphabet 3 - cutting excess rubber away
carving the alphabet 3 – cutting excess rubber away

Then I could start carving, which was not difficult or exhausting but took some time. I worked several evenings on this carving project, each time finishing five or six letters.

carving the alphabet 1 - carving the letters and some texture
carving the alphabet 1 – carving the letters and some texture

Finally, my alphabet was complete:

carving the alphabet 5 - all letters - finished
carving the alphabet 5 – all letters – finished

I could continue with applying my letter-stamps on fabric:

printing with self-carved letters of the alphabet
printing with self-carved letters of the alphabet

These are the results of some of the projects I have used the stamps for so far:

post 91 - carving project - printing letters
post 91 – carving project – printing letters

 

post 91 - carving project - printing letters - example 2
post 91 – carving project – printing letters – example 2
post 91 - carving project - printing letters - example 3
post 91 – carving project – printing letters – example 3

Next time, I’ll show you some of the round stamps I recently carved from rubber blocks, and some examples of the many ways we can use them.

Are you curious to learn more about stamp-carving?

A big part of the new book ‘Relax creatively – Fabric painting – Your fast & easy guide, number 2 – Stamping’ focuses on carving projects.

It’s the second book in my series about fabric painting and will be published soon. (Click on this link for more information about the book series.)

If you are a subscriber to this blog, you can order a sample tutorial from the stamping book for free. Click HERE to learn more about this offer.

Don’t miss any project presentation or information on the new fabric painting book series: SIGN UP TO OUR BLOG TO RECEIVE A SHORT EMAIL WHEN A NEW POST IS PUBLISHED.

Cheers,

Margot