No 86 – Series: Fabric Painting Techniques – Stamping, Part 7

Carving stamps is relaxing and fun!

But it needs practice! Keep your fingers out of the way! 🙂

Dear subscribers and readers of Your Colourful Mind,

In our ongoing discussion (see Post No 76) of

Various categories of stamp production

  • Using commercial stamps
  • Using simple objects as stamps (Post No 74 and No 76)
  • Creating composed stamps (Post No 79)
  • Creating cut stamps (see Post No 80, No 81 and No 84)
  • Creating carved stamps

we today start a little series of project presentations which focus on the

Creation of carved stamps

Carving is a soothing and relaxing process. – However, it is an activity that needs practice!

We need practice and patience in order to properly meet the special demands of any shape, material and tool we wish to work with.

A few erasers can be used as a cheap and easy ‘starter carving set’.

They are large enough for practicing our carving skills, and it won’t be a disaster if the carving doesn’t work out as planned: We just start again with a new set of erasers.

Project – Carving simple eraser stamps

In one of the last posts (No 79) I used four erasers to create a composed stamp.

The printing with that stamp went well, so I kept it in my ‘Useful stamp collection’ box.

Now I decided that it was time to use the stamp again.

Fabric painting - Material for carving - rubber erasers
Fabric painting – Material for carving – rubber erasers

But before using it to print a design on an apron, I wanted to change the prints’ outlook.

I used my linoleum cutters to give each of the four erasers an individual ‘outfit’ by carving a pattern on it that differed from the other three stamps’ patterns.

fabric painting - self-carved eraser stamps - carving with linoleum cutters
fabric painting – self-carved eraser stamps – carving with linoleum cutters
fabric stamping - comparison - eraser stamp - before and after carving
fabric stamping – comparison – eraser stamp – before and after carving

The printing was fun and worked out well!

fabric painting - printing with self-carved eraser stamp on apron
post 86 – fabric painting – printing with self-carved eraser stamp on apron

 How to practice our carving skills

Working on projects like this one is a good way to practice our carving skills:

  • Using easy-to-carve materials such as rubber erasers
  • and choosing simple carving patterns
  • helps us to get a feeling for the carving materials and tools and processes,
  • and enables us to achieve nice printing results immediately.

In the next carving project, I will again – for practicing purposes – work with very simple patterns. Nevertheless, the carving might be a bit more difficult as I plan not only to use rubber erasers but also linoleum sheets as carving materials.

New book on Stamping – Learn more about carving stamps

A big part of the new book ‘Relax creatively – Fabric stamping – Your fast & easy guide Number 2 – Stampingfocuses on carving projects.

Detailed information on all necessary carving supplies, step-by-step instructions with lots of images, and a broad collection of tips and tricks help the carving beginner to get an easy start.

The book ‘Stamping’ (for more information on the book series see Post 83) will be published soon.

If you are a subscriber to this blog, you can order a sample tutorial for free (information on this: Post 85)

Don’t miss any project presentation or information on the new fabric painting book series: SIGN UP TO OUR BLOG TO RECEIVE A SHORT EMAIL WHEN A NEW POST IS PUBLISHED.

Cheers,

Margot

No 85 – Fabric painting tutorial – For free! – An exclusive offer to the subscribers of this blog

New fabric painting book series – to be published soon!

Get an early ‘look insight’ for free:

A step-by-step tutorial: Relax with fabric stamping

Dear subscribers and readers of Your Colourful Mind,

Recently (see post No 83) I informed you about a new series of fabric painting guide books which will be available very soon.

I also described the structure of the series and gave a short summary of the content of the books.

Today I wish to give you some information on the background of the book-publishing project

Why I became a fabric painter

I discovered fabric painting some years ago, when I had a very hectic and demanding job and needed a new and creative way to relax and recover from the stress.

My timely discovery of fabric painting was the start of an enduring fascination with it.

Ever since, I‘ve been using the various fabric-painting techniques to create colourful designs on my clothes and household accessories.

Whenever I’m engaged in this easy-to-do activity, I’m simultaneously creating, relaxing and producing, and enjoying myself immensely.

Why I became a fabric-painting blogger

Having experienced the many pleasures of fabric painting, I can assert that anyone can start practicing and enjoying it immediately.

That’s why I launched the website Your Colourful Mind about a year ago: to help other people active or interested in fabric painting to easily meet and support each other and to share information, knowledge and experiences.

You, the visitors and readers of Your Colourful Mind have made the website/blog a success.

Many of you come around from time to time, again and again. And some of you, the subscribers of the blog, regularly read the posts and make use of the information and fabric painting project ideas they offer.

I thank you very much for your interest and engagement!

And I am, of course, especially grateful to those of you who share their ideas, suggestions and experiences via email with me.

Why I’m now a fabric-painting blogger and book writer

Thanks to your feedback I know that the blog posts usually manage to offer interesting design ideas and useful tips to the more experienced fabric painter.

However, the blog posts are not so helpful to those of you who haven’t started yet.

Very often, I get asked how and where the absolute beginner can find structured guidance and support enabling him (her) to get easy access into fabric painting and the different techniques.

So far, I couldn’t give an answer to this kind of questions.

I’m struggling, too, to find a single source of information which focuses exclusively and comprehensively on fabric painting.

That’s why I decided to start writing a series of guide books on fabric painting.

The series addresses the needs and interests of fabric painting beginners;

those people

  • who want to get a fast and easy access to the basics and main techniques of painting on fabric;
  • who don’t wish to become world-known artists, but to start with an exciting activity which helps them to relax creatively.

Currently, I am having a lot of fun transferring the fabric-painting experiences and expertise I gained from my personal projects to this series of guide books, which I hope many other people find helpful in becoming fascinated and relaxed fabric painters too.

When will the first books of the series be available?

Your fast and easy guide number 1, The basics, is being edited currently and will be published in March 2013.

Your fast & easy guide number 2, Stamping, is nearly finished and will be published soon after guide number 1.

I’ll be publishing guide number 3, Stencilling, later this year, and following it with guide number 4, Freehand painting, and guide number 5, Fabric colouring in.

Special offer to the subscribers of this blog

I’ll publish the fabric painting guide books on Amazon.

As soon as a book is published on Amazon, any interested person can use the ‘Look insight’ to get an idea of the content and characteristics of a new book.

However, you, the subscribers of my blog, have the opportunity to get an early ‘Look insight’ into guide number 2, Stamping, now!

Just send me an email (margot@your-colourful-mind.com) if you are interested in getting the step-by-step instructions for a fabric stamping project.

I promise that you’ll receive the little tutorial (pdf-file) within the following next three days. For free!

Cheers,

Margot

No 84 – Series: Fabric Painting Techniques – Stamping, Part 6

CUTTING STAMPS from different materials. Today: Yoga foam blocks.

Dear friends of Your Colourful Mind,

Today we continue our discussion of

Various categories of stamp production:
  • Using commercial stamps
  • Using simple objects as stamps
  • Creating composed stamps
  • Creating cut stamps (see Post No 80 and No 81 for stamps cut from foam sheets)
  • Creating carved stamps

For the last projects of our little series on fabric stamping we used foam sheets to cut stamps.

The stamp material today is foam, again.

But instead of using craft shops’ foam supplies, I got a yoga foam block from a sporting goods store.

Project – Stamping with ‘yoga foam block’ stamps

Foam is a soft material and is usually at least partially malleable.

I decided to experiment a bit to find out how to I could make use of that attribute.

The idea was to use different household objects to shape the foam or to leave impressions on its surface and then use the changed foam block parts as stamps.

First I walked around and collected little objects which could be suitable tools.

Fabric painting - collecting materials for the stamp creation
post 84 – Fabric painting – collecting materials for the stamp creation

Then I cut the foam block into smaller pieces of different sizes.

Fabric painting - cutting a foam block into smaller pieces to create stamps
post 84 -Fabric painting – cutting a foam block into smaller pieces to create stamps

Now I applied the different tools. I pressed or drilled them into the foam pieces.

Here are some examples of my experiments:

Fabric painting - using different objects to create stamping designs on foam blocks
post 84 – Fabric painting – using different objects to create stamping designs on foam blocks

Not every object worked as expected but I continued my experimenting, now using all of the changed foam pieces as stamps.

Fabric painting - printing with foam block pieces and the tools used to shape them
post 84 – Fabric painting – printing with foam block pieces and the tools used to shape them

The next two images show the printing results:

Fabric painting - Printing with foam stamps on T-Shirt
post 84- Fabric painting – Printing with foam stamps on T-Shirt
Fabric painting - printing with foam stamps on apron
post 84 – Fabric painting – printing with foam stamps on apron

The experimenting was fun. And I find the results very special. 🙂

We’ll continue our little series on fabric stamping with some examples of carving projects soon.

Have you worked with ‘untypical’ material in your stamping projects? What kind of tools and supplies did you use? Did everything work according to you plans?

Please, share images of you work with us! (Send them to margot@your-colourful-mind.com).

Don’t miss any project presentation: SIGN UP TO OUR BLOG TO RECEIVE A SHORT EMAIL WHEN A NEW POST IS PUBLISHED.

(I’ll soon offer a little gift to all blog subscribers! 🙂

Margot

No 83 – Announcement – New series of fabric painting books (not only) for beginners

Relax creatively – Fabric painting – Your fast & easy guides. 

Easy to read on mobile phones, tablets and similar devices!

Dear friends of Your Colourful Mind,

Most of you, the readers and subscribers of Your Colourful Mind’s blog, are experienced fabric painters already.

You know how to paint on fabric and use the posts to get ideas and inspirations for new fabric painting projects.

You also know how relaxing and creative fabric painting is. And how much fun!

However, many people don’t know much about fabric painting and the benefits it offers.

Or they have no idea how to get started.

Fabric painting beginners struggle to get a fast and easy start.

Searching for books on fabric painting

Of course, there are books on the market which are related to fabric painting.

But many of them address only the experienced fabric painter or fabric surface designer and don’t meet the needs and interests of fabric painting beginners.

Several books can be found which explain special painting techniques such as stencilling.

However, often the instructions explain the technique’s application in general, and don’t teach you about the specialties of the application on fabric and apparel items.

Searching for information on fabric painting on the Internet

It is also not easy and very time-consuming to find detailed and reliable information on the internet.

There is no single source of information which focuses exclusively and comprehensively on fabric painting.

That’s what the book series intends to change.

 

Who is the target audience of the guide books?

The series addresses the needs and interests of fabric painting beginners;

those people

  • who want to get a fast and easy access to the basics and main techniques of painting on fabric;
  • who don’t wish to become world-known artists, but to start with an exciting activity which helps them to relax creatively.

How is the series “Fabric Painting – Your fast & easy guide(s)” structured?

The guide number 1, The basics, is all you need to get started.

It offers a comprehensive collection of immediately usable knowledge about painting on fabrics, including information on:

  • the kind of fabric items you can paint on,
  • the types of available paints, and their main characteristics,
  • the basic equipment, materials and tools,
  • the design idea development process,
  • different fabric painting techniques, such as stamping, stencilling, freehand painting and fabric colouring-in.

The following guides then help you to move on.

Each of the following books concentrates on just one fabric painting technique which allows you to bring your theoretical and practical skills to a higher level.

Leading step-by-step through the different projects, the guides help you to experience and to apply each technique in various ways.

Many photographs and images are included to make every step easy to understand and to follow.

WHEN will the books of the series be published?

Fabric painting - Your easy and fast guide number 1 - The basics
post 83 – Fabric painting – Your easy and fast guide number 1 – The basics

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Your fast and easy guide number 1, The basics, is being edited currently and will be published in March 2017.

Fabric painting - Your fast and easy guide number 2 - Stamping

post 83 – Fabric painting – Your fast and easy guide number 2 – Stamping

 

Your fast & easy guide number 2, Stamping, is nearly finished and will be published soon after guide number 1.

I’ll be publishing guide number 3, Stencilling, later this year, and following it with guide number 4, Freehand painting, and guide number 5, Fabric colouring in.

WHERE will the guide books be published?

The books will be published on Amazon.

In the beginning, they will be available as EBooks, easily accessible and downloadable using the Kindle-App (which is available for free).

You’ll be able to read the books wherever you are!

A special formatting software has been used to make the reading experience on mobile phones and similar devices especially pleasant; you’ll NOT have to zoom in and out all the time! 🙂

It is also planned to offer printed versions of the books soon after they have been published as EBooks.

The easiest way to receive information about the publication dates

and other book-related news is to subscribe to Your Colourful Mind‘s blog. Just click here.

Cheers,

Margot

No 82 – Fabric Painting – How to pep up your clothes

Bring a fresh injection to your wardrobe!

Add some colour or pattern to unloved or boring clothes

Dear friends of Your Colourful Mind,

Before we start a new activity, we usually consider the money, time and effort we’ll have to invest and the value and benefits we expect to get.

I am sure, you asked yourself these questions, too, before you made the decision to get into fabric painting.

Using fabric paints to pep up old clothes

The good thing about fabric painting is, that we can use the fabric painting supplies and tools not only for the creation of something completely new.

Besides designing new apparels or decorative household items, we can use our paints and other equipment to work on old clothes and give them a changed and fresh outlook.

Using fabric spray to give fabric items a brighter or more colourful look

is one of the embellishment opportunities of fabric painting we have already discussed.

We used it

  • to refurbish old deck chairs (see Post No. 63),
  • to change the colour of our clothes (Post No. 25)
  • to give our not so successful fabric painting designs a completely new look (Post No. 11)
Using paint brush and fabric paints to inject new life into old clothes

Taking out a paint brush and some fabric paints is a good idea if we wish to hide stains on our favoured clothes or to pep up unloved fabric items. (Have a look at some examples in Post No. 12.)

The following two projects both helped to make something look better:

Project 1 – Using self-made stamps to hide stains on a T-shirt

I recently created a stamp and used it not only to decorate new T-shirts but also to make an old one nice again.

The stamp was composed of hair elastics which I attached to a wooden block.

fabric painting - preparing a composed stamp - hair elastics around wooden block
fabric painting – preparing a composed stamp – hair elastics around wooden block

I used this stamp to hide stains on a Polo-Shirt.

The stamp was loaded with paint by rubbing it in the paint which I had distributed on the palette with a brayer roller.

fabric painting - printing with self-made composed stamp - hair elastics around wood block
fabric painting – printing with self-made composed stamp – hair elastics around wood block

When I had finished the printing, the stains on the shirt were no longer visible!

post82- fabric painting - printing with self-made composed stamp on T-shirt - 99
post82- fabric painting – printing with self-made composed stamp on T-shirt – 99

 

Project 2 – Using metallic bright paint to pep up an old jacket

My running jacket is black. At least, it WAS black. And dark. And boring.

As I didn’t like to wear it any longer but also didn’t want to throw it away, I had to do something about it.

I decided to give it a fresh look with the help of some fabric painting.

It was not as easy as I had thought.

I first used a fabric paint which claimed to be suitable to be used on dark fabric.

fabric painting - unsuccessful painting project - the fabric paint is not suitable for dark fabric
fabric painting – unsuccessful painting project – the fabric paint is not suitable for dark fabric

It couldn’t keep to its promise, – after all my painting effort, there was nothing to see on the jacket.

fabric painting - the painting on a dark jacket is not successful
fabric painting – the painting on a dark jacket is not successful

However, I didn’t give up and tried it again with another paint.

fabric painting - metallic bright fabric paint works well on dark fabric
fabric painting – metallic bright fabric paint works well on dark fabric

This is the result and I am happy with it, I started to wear my running jacket again whenever it’s cold in the morning.

post82 - fabric painting - dark running jacket pepped up - 100
post82 – fabric painting – dark running jacket pepped up – 100

 

Have you used your fabric paints to change the look of old clothes? Did everything work according to you plans?

Please, share images of you work with us! (Send them to margot@your-colourful-mind.com).

 

Don’t miss any project presentation: SIGN UP TO OUR BLOG TO RECEIVE A SHORT EMAIL WHEN A NEW POST IS PUBLISHED.

Cheers,

Margot

No 81 – Series: Fabric Painting Techniques – Stamping, Part 5

Easy, inexpensive and fun:

self-made foam stamps are very flexible printing tools.

 

Dear friends of Your Colourful Mind,

We have made huge progress in our discussion of

Various categories of stamp production:

  • Using commercial stamps
  • Using simple objects as stamps
  • Creating composed stamps
  • Creating cut stamps (see Post No 80 for stamps cut from foam sheets)
  • Creating carved stamps

The recent posts (see posts No 74, 76, 79 and 80) made clear how easy it can be to organize, find or create our own stamps.

At the moment we focus on the forth category of stamp production:

Creating cut stamps

The stamp base

Whenever we use flat materials such as foam or cardboard sheets to cut out pieces which we can use to print designs and patterns, we need a stamp base on which we can stick the loose pieces.

We can use objects such as wood blocks as a stamp base but flat materials such as cork or cardboard sheets are also suitable.

When using flat materials as stamp base, the handling of the stamp is easier, if we glue a self-made handle at the back of the stamp base.

fabric painting - foam stamp on cardboard base with handle at the back
fabric painting – foam stamp on cardboard base with handle at the back

Here, for example, the foam shapes were glued on a flat cardboard stamp base.

On its back a simple handle was attached, also made of cardboard. Now the stamp can be properly placed on the fabric, and can be lifted without slipping and paint-smudging.

Using craft foam sheets to create stamps

The first two projects of self-made foam stamps were presented in the last post; here is another example:

Project 3 – Using differently sized geometric foam shapes to create flexibly usable stamps

Cutting stamps from foam sheets can be very easy.

Here, I draw some lines on a piece of foam and then used a craft knife to cut out the simple geometric shapes.

fabric painting - cutting geometric shapes from foam sheet
fabric painting – cutting geometric shapes from foam sheet

Then I attached the foam shapes with double adhesive tape to cardboard pieces which had the same sizes as the cut foam pieces.

fabric painting - attaching foam shapes on cardboard stamp base
fabric painting – attaching foam shapes on cardboard stamp base

The potential of these so simple geometric stamps is limitless!

This is just one project example:

post 81-fabric painting - printing with self-made geometric foam stamps on t-shirt - 98
post 81-fabric painting – printing with self-made geometric foam stamps on t-shirt – 98

 

The last three projects all belong into our forth category of stamp production, now it’s time to learn more about the fifth category.

We’ll soon begin with our first stamp-carving projects.

Have you ever cut a stamp? Which kind of material did you use? Did everything work according to you plans?

Please, share images of you work with us! (Send them to margot@your-colourful-mind.com).

Don’t miss any project presentation: SIGN UP TO OUR BLOG TO RECEIVE A SHORT EMAIL WHEN A NEW POST IS PUBLISHED.

Cheers,

Margot

Relax creatively!