No 64 – Fabric Painting Design & Techniques – Gallery of project images reorganized at Your Colourful Mind

Project Images Gallery – Now it’s easy to find project examples of different fabric painting techniques

Dear friends of Your Colourful Mind,

Nine months ago we launched our website and blog Your Colourful Mind. We have published more than 60 posts since then, many of them presenting images of our fabric painting projects.

So far, we collected and sorted our project images into three different albums within our Gallery:

Why we had to renovate our Gallery of fabric painting project images

During the past weeks, I got emails and blog-comments from some of our regular visitors, asking for more detailed information about different fabric painting techniques and for some guidance on how to apply them: detailed tutorials or check-lists and other background information.

I am glad about any feedback from your side and take it always very seriously. Thus I am thinking about how we can better deliver what you expect from Your Colourful Mind.

Most projects presented in our posts are not success-proven procedures but experiments with unforeseeable results. And, yes, many of them do end up with results which differ from what we had expected before we started the project. 🙂  🙁

The creativeness of  Your Colourful Minis based on Learning-by-doing

Here, at Your Colourful Mind, unexpected effects and results are positive features of our projects, failures and strange outcomes are welcome.

Anything that doesn’t go according to our planning supports our learning and helps to understand the fabric painting tools, materials and procedures better.

The project presentations, therefore, can’t be seen as professional instructions from an experienced fabric painter.

How can we integrate profound project assistance and check-lists in Your Colourful Mind?

A quick solution is not an option; we just have to start working on this and will progress over time.

A very first step has been done already, the Gallery of our images has been reorganized recently and now offers better access to a deeper understanding of fabric painting techniques.

The reorganized Gallery offers the following additional albums of our project images, each focusing on one fabric painting technique:

So, we don’t have detailed tutorials on offer at the moment, 🙁 , but it’s easy now to find project ideas by strolling through the painting techniques’ albums 🙂 .

And we plan to start publishing a series of tutorials soon. Promised!

Do you have a special fabric painting technique in mind you would like to learn more about? Please, send your ideas and suggestions for our how-to-do-series to  margot@your-colourful-mind.com.

Make sure that you don’t miss out on any new projects and, in future, tutorials:  sign up to receive new blog posts via email.

Many thanks again to all of you who sent in their feedback already, it will help to improve Your Colourful Mind and the fabric painting abilities of all of us.

Cheers,

signature - Margot

No 61 – Series: Fabric Painting Techniques – WET & DRY TECHNIQUES – Learning from mistakes

Painting on wet fabric – Don’t expect exact and accurate results! 🙂

Dear friends of Your Colourful Mind,

Planning creative activities and expecting special results 

Last time, when we experimented with salt-printing on wet fabric (Post 60), some of the results differed from what we had expected to see.

This experience, of course, is quite typical for any creative process: We start with a concrete idea on our mind and sometimes end up with something that looks completely different.

In most cases, that’s not a disaster, very often the final result is even nicer or more creative than our original idea.

But it also happens that we are definitely and absolutely not happy with the results of our work. This can especially be the case if we work with a new material or tool or technique for the first time.

Fabric paint can be a “headstrong and stubborn partner” in the painting process

The different wet fabric painting techniques are especially challenging because on wet fabric the paint often develops its own life and behaves in unexpected ways.

So, when I started experimenting with wet techniques, I assumed that I would have to learn a lot and that many of my first projects might not meet my expectations. I bought some cheap aprons and tea-towels, because I didn’t want to waste more expensive fabrics and garments.

Be adventurous and enjoy risk-taking when you start to learn new creative techniques

I am still an absolute beginner in the field of wet fabric techniques.

But most of what I have learned so far is based on the failures I made. Or, – to express it in a more positive way -, on “unexpected project developments”. 🙂

Example:

fabric painting techniques - apron - wet - sprinkling salt on wet painted areas - dark-edged rings
post 61 – fabric painting techniques – apron – wet – sprinkling salt on wet painted areas – dark-edged rings

I presented this apron last time already (Post 60) to show that the salt-printing process was not as effectual as expected.

My assumption was that I should have created a thicker paint layer when I spray-painted the fabric. And, perhaps, I should have used more salt or salt with larger crystals.

Thus, – not the desired result, but a worthy learning gain.

But with this apron, something else went wrong and taught me something new.

Prior to the spray-painting, I had sprayed one half of the apron with water to make it wet or at least dampen it. The other half I left dry.

As we can see, working on wet AND dry fabric can have unwanted consequences: when the fabric and the paint got dry, an ugly dark-edged ring developed where the former dry and wet areas met. It also seems that I hadn’t dampened the wet half evenly because there, too, a dark-edged ring of colour showed up.

Summary:

This simple project that didn’t proceed as I planned it and that could be seen as a failure, on the other hand succeeded in giving me at least the following insights:

  • Use salt with larger crystals for salt-printing projects because the larger the crystals, the more paint gets wicked and the larger the formations.
  • Take care that the area where you wish to place the salt is wet enough and that you apply sufficient paint. And use paint which is thin (diluted) enough.
  • Expect dark-edged rings where dry and wet areas of the fabric meet each other. To avoid this, you might decide to make the whole piece of fabric wet and not only parts of it.

Do you have experienced “failures” which helped you get new insights?

Share your experiences with us: Fill in the comment-form below or send your email to margot@your-colourful-mind.com.

Make sure that you don’t miss out on any further information about fabric paints:  sign up to receive new blog posts via email.

Have fun with your (wet) fabric painting projects, and share images of the results with us!

signature - Margot

No 60 – Series: Fabric Painting Techniques – WET & DRY TECHNIQUES – Experimenting with salt

How to use ROCK SALT to create special painting effects on wet fabric

Dear friends of Your Colourful Mind,

Painting on wet fabric offers many different opportunities which are not available when working on dry fabric.

The last two posts discussed some of the special characteristics of wet fabric painting techniques:
  • Paint application tools such as paint brushes, foam brushes and the many other objects which help us to apply the paint on the fabric, have different effects and create other results when used on wet instead of dry fabric. (see Post 58)
  • The paint colour-bleeding process on wet fabric needs some time to really show its effects. But as soon as the paint and the fabric are completely dry, we realize that on wet fabric the paint develops its own life. It doesn’t just stay where it was applied but moves into neighbouring areas on the fabric. (see Post 59)

We can assume that further specialties of wet techniques will show up as soon as we continue our painting experiments on wet fabric.

Before we do so, we briefly come back to an insight we made during recent projects:

Fabric painting doesn’t have to be an expensive activity.

Not everything we use for our painting projects has to be bought in a craft shop. We just need to look around us to find new and creative tools and objects.

The nature around us can deliver painting objects which we experienced when we used leaves as stamps in one of our recent projects (see Post 53).

And our kitchen actually can become a great supplier of fabric painting equipment, as we saw already when we did some nature printing on dry fabric, with fruit and vegetable stamps. (see Post 49 and Post 56)

Now, for our next wet fabric project, we go back into the kitchen and this time get some salt which should assist us to create special painting effects.

Using salt to create special effects – A painting method which only works on wet fabric.

Example 1

fabric painting techniques - apron - wet - sprinkling salt on wet painted fabric
post 60 – fabric painting techniques – apron – wet – sprinkling salt on wet painted fabric

I used a foam brush to apply transparent paint onto an apron which I had sprayed wet before. Then I sprinkled salt on some parts of the painted areas. First, it didn’t have any effects.

fabric painting techniques - apron - wet - sprinkling salt on wet painted fabric - zoomed
post 60 – fabric painting techniques – apron – wet – sprinkling salt on wet painted fabric – zoomed

But, as this zoomed picture of a smaller part of the apron shows, then the salt started to pull the water out of the fabric, leaving little stronger coloured dots.

Example 2

fabric painting techniques - green apron - wet - sprinkling salt on wet spray-painted fabric - zoomed
post 60 – fabric painting techniques – green apron – wet – sprinkling salt on wet spray-painted fabric – zoomed

I took another apron and sprayed it wet again.  Then I sprayed it with green and pink fabric spray paint. Finally, when the fabric and the paint were still wet, I placed some rock salts in a small area of the apron.

fabric painting techniques - green apron - wet - sprinkling salt on wet spray-painted fabric
post 60 – fabric painting techniques – green apron – wet – sprinkling salt on wet spray-painted fabric

This image of the apron shows that the sprinkles caused by the salt are not so easy to see. The effect might have been bigger if I had spread on a thicker layer of paint.

Example 3

fabric painting techniques - t-shirt - wet - sprinkling salt on wet painted areas - zoomed
post 60 – fabric painting techniques – t-shirt – wet – sprinkling salt on wet painted areas – zoomed

Here, I sprinkled a little bit of the rock salt on some areas of a still wet t-shirt on which I before had applied some fabric paint with a bigger foam brush.

The zoomed image shows that the salt creates little colour dots with stronger coloured edges.

fabric painting techniques - t-shirt - wet - sprinkling salt on wet painted areas
post 60 – fabric painting techniques – t-shirt – wet – sprinkling salt on wet painted areas

 

Summary of results and learning effects:

  • The salt has to be placed on the wet fabric immediately after painting it.
  • The fabric and the paint have still to be quite wet.
  • The water-pulling effects of the salt are better visible on a thicker layer of paint.
  • The salt leaves little dots with strong-coloured edges on the fabric.

In the beginning, things often run into an unexpected and sometimes unwanted direction.

But the projects above demonstrate that and how our try-and-error approach is a good way to bring us further on our learning path.

Over time, we will develop a broad knowledge and understanding of what might happen with our painting ideas under different conditions. 🙂

I am quite excited and looking forward to further experimenting with painting on wet fabric.

Please, share your work with us and send images of it and some background information by email to margot@your-colourful-mind.com.

Don’t forget to sign up to receive new blog posts via email, because this makes sure that you won’t miss any of our future projects.

I wish you a good time,

signature - Margot

 

Relax creatively!